How to add an entry for Zend Studio in your Ubuntu programs list

I had been trying to add a shortcut/entry for Zend studio in my Ubuntu 11.10.  Finally I could find a way to make Zend studio entry come up in the Unity Application search or Filter. Actually its a rather straight forward procedure. Create a file zendstudio.desktop in the /usr/share/applications/ as root, add the following contents to it, using your editor of choice(I used vi editor).

[Desktop Entry]
Version=9.0
Name=Zend Studio
GenericName=PHP IDE
Type=Application
Comment=Zend's PHP IDE
Exec=/opt/ZendStudio/ZendStudio
Icon=/opt/ZendStudio/icon.xpm
StartupNotify=false
Terminal=false
Type=Application
Categories=Programming;


Courtesy:
http://thanhquanky.wordpress.com/2011/06/28/create-icon-in-unity-ubuntu-11-04-natty-narwhal/
(You could check out the above link to find way to add antry for any custom software using the same method).

N.B: Its my first blog post after nearly one year. Hope that I can follow it with more such useful posts.
The above method was tested by me in Unity based Ubuntu. But it should work fine in any GNOME based OS.

A Few things about ‘Ubuntu Pocket Guide and Reference’

Ubuntu Pocket Guide and Reference is currently in v1.1.


Everything about the Book

At just 5.25 x 8 inches and 166 pages, Ubuntu Pocket Guide and Reference is a compact yet comprehensive guide to everyday Ubuntu use.It’s ideal for those who need vital information on all aspects of using Ubuntu, but who don’t have time to wade through thick documentation.

Each chapter of Ubuntu Pocket Guide and Reference tackles an aspect of Ubuntu.First, you learn about installation—getting Ubuntu onto your computer, after which you learn how to configure your computer’s hardware.
Following this, you’re introduced to the Ubuntu desktop, and the tricks and techniques of efficient day-to-day usage. The book then describes the highways of the Ubuntu filesystem, and gives a full run-down of Ubuntu’s file manager.
Next, the command-line is tackled in-depth, after which software management is explained. Finally, system security is described—configuring the firewall, installing antivirus, and encrypting sensitive data. Appendixes provide a glossary of terms, and a guide to understanding technical documentation.
Written for anybody switching to Ubuntu, particularly former Windows users, Ubuntu Pocket Guide and Reference assumes zero Linux knowledge. It provides the wisdom of the expert user and concisely conveys core competencies.

Table Of contents-

  1. Installing Ubuntu
  2. Configuring Ubuntu
  3. Getting to grips with the desktop
  4. Users and the filesystem
  5. Hands-on at the command-line
  6. Software management
  7. Securing the system
APPENDIX A: Glossary of terms
APPENDIX B: Learning more and getting help

Now what are you waiting for, my fellow Ubuntu users and prospective Ubuntu users. Get your hands on this amazing book at-

http://www.ubuntupocketguide.com/index_main.html